Tuesday, March 24, 2009

How to shop for used stairlifts part 3


The last and final step in shopping for a used stair lift is step three:

3. Execute the purchase

While this may seem the most simple and obvious step, it is usually the speed bump that everyone inevitably hits. Why you ask? To put it bluntly, there are so many places offering stair lifts that the numbers and information can be staggering… and often put the consumer in an immobilized state which renders them unable to make a calculated decision. A great adage that I use often is “keep it simple stupid” otherwise known as K.I.S.S. There are sites out there that are safe to peruse at your leisure and will in the very least offer information and details on all sorts of stair lifts. Sites like Ebay are good, as you can look at what others are selling and find out what the stair lifts are or have sold for in the past.

Another site that works well is craigslist… you are most often dealing with individuals that are trying to sell a used stair lift. Problem with craigslist is that it can be a little difficult to navigate, not to mention the volume of people who are selling used stair lifts… believe me, there are a lot! Again, it is usually sensory overload.

One site that I recommend is our site, http://www.stairliftexchange.com/ . This site is wonderful! It is very accessible, navigational, and great to use. It is divided into two main sections “New and used stair lifts” and “Bath tub lifts”. It’s a one click destination to finding quality stair lifts, both new and used, at very competitive prices. You can also post an ad if you are selling a stair lift. Best of all, and this is the real McCoy, there are NO FEES! It is strictly ad sponsored which makes for an easy and effective way to get your stair lift online and sold. I would encourage visiting this site as it has helped me greatly in my efforts of finding a used stair lift.
Well, we’ve come to the end of the article. I hope that all the information you read was helpful and easy to understand and will be useful to you in preparing yourself for the investment of a stair lift. Again, if I may, please take a moment to visit our site at http://www.stairliftexchange.com/ , it is well worth your time… and if you are like many of our customers, it will be well worth your money as well.

Have a great day!

How to shop for used stairlifts part 2


2. Develop a plan:


Many people do not have a plan in place when making their decision on what kind a of stair lift they either want or need. It’s similar to those who are wanting to remodel their living room and go to a store and buy random furniture and decorations, only to go back home, put it all together and realize that nothing matches or works quite how they thought it would. A few questions to ask yourself in planning for a used stair lift are: Are the stairs indoor or outdoor? Are they straight or do they curve? How wide is the staircase? What is the overall length of the staircase? Do you want to install this yourself or have someone else install it? Is the person using this above or under 350 lb? Which operating system are you looking for: rack and pinion, drum and cable, or worm gear? Do you want a stair lift that folds up thereby creating more space on the stairs, or something that is stationary and blocks the staircase? Does it carry any sort of warranty? These are all great questions to ask yourself ahead of time so that you are prepared and have a plan in place before you purchase.

How to shop for used stairlifts part 1


When shopping for a used stair lift there are several mistakes that “first-timers” or “newbies” either make or ultimately create for themselves. The purpose of this article is to guide you, the reader, into a plan that will help you find the perfect used stair lift and avoid common pitfalls.
There are several key areas of focus that we will be going over today. Some areas we will be focusing on are: motherboards vs. stair lifts without motherboards, Self-install vs. Company install, and “the warranty” to name a few. These areas, as you will find in your endeavors, will prove to be very helpful.


I will be guiding you along a three step process that will enable you to locate and purchase a used stair lift in a confident, well thought out manner… versus aimlessly walking in the dark and hoping to find that elusive deal that more often than not comes with strings attached.
Shall we begin?


Step one in shopping for a used stair lift would be to:
1. Take time to Research
“Many people will buy at once, but a big proportion will wait to think things over” I read this in an article for tips on selling. I can tell you from my experience that this is true and is a huge help in determining exactly what is out there. The more that you can equip yourself ahead of time, the better off you will be in the end when it comes down to the actual purchase.
However in the meantime… you can visit http://www.stairliftexchange.com/ to look at all sorts of New and secondhand stair lifts.


If you ever go into a Starbucks, you will notice on their front counter, between the registers, sits an impulse fixture. This is designed to lure the customer into in impulse buy, and more often than not achieves its purpose. With the right research you will avoid that hassle. Some areas of research are:


A. Self install vs. Company install: There are many different kinds of stair lifts out there, all with different set-ups and designs… some very simple, others extremely difficult. A lot of the stair lifts that are advertised as “self-install” aren’t too difficult to install and with the instructions and a little elbow grease, you can usually breeze through one of those in about 2 ½ hours or less. Other stair lifts that are much more complicated usually require a trained technician that has been doing installs on a regular basis and would know exactly how to trouble shoot any problems you may come across. All in all, I would recommend getting the stair lift installed by professionals who can insure that everything is accurate and in place. This may cost you a little more money upfront, but having peace of mind with whoever will be using this, is well worth the small investment.

B. Motherboards vs. None: I’ve seen both pros and cons with both sides on this one. Stair lifts that have motherboards installed are usually much nicer, quieter, and have a sleeker design.
Some of the cons to a stair lift that has a motherboard installed are: The motherboard is usually prone to things that will wear away at it such as dust, vibrations, and static shock. Replacing a motherboard is usually a timely and costly approach… but unfortunately, one that is needed.

Stair lifts that do not have a motherboard installed have a simple design, and although they can be a bulkier machine, they much more than hold their weight [no pun intended] when lined up against their rival. Many of these stair lifts use the drum and cable drive system versus the rack and pinion drive system. Rack and pinions are used much more in stair lifts these days; however, we have had elevators in place everywhere [that use the drum and cable drive system] and are dependable and get the job done since the 1700’s.
Some downsides are that they are much bulkier, noisier, and not as sleek. If you can get passed the aesthetics, they are still a dependable machine.

C. The warranty: This is absolutely imperative when you are looking at anything of this caliber. Make sure there is some sort of insurance or safe-guard in place as part of the whole purchase. Most used stair lifts still carry the manufacturer’s warranty, granted that you have all the necessary documentation as proof of ownership. You may even come across dealers that provide a warranty alongside the manufacturer’s warranty. Although this may be hard to come by, it is worth investigating. When all is said and done, you want to make sure that you are not left up the creek without a paddle.

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